Matrix 4 Movie Spoiler Free Review

Matrix 4 Movie Spoiler Free Review

This is a distorted review of The Matrix Resurrections, coming to theaters and HBO Max on December 22nd. Nostalgia fistulas often trash remakes, reboots, or long lead sequels. They call them open cash grabs or cheap tent pool cars just to play in the decades-old passion. Such statements may be easy to dismiss, but unfortunately, fans who were skeptical of the second sequel to The Matrix are right when it comes to the Matrix Judgment Day.

 
  Of course there are good parts. The return of Keanu Reeves and Carrie-Anne Moss as Neo and Trinity is a dream come true, and new players add to the cast. Jonathan Grove eats every scene he has as Smith, and Jessica Hanwick’s bugs can really be the best part of Doomsday. And the weird version of Morpheus presented here probably wouldn’t even start working if it were someone other than Yahya Abdul Matin II in the cartoonish suit. In fact, I would even say that the matrix has become doomsday. Almost completely with good ideas. The problem is, this is not a good movie. It’s a group of individually clean ideas decorated in a trench coat like a group of kids trying to buy a ticket to an R-rated movie. Cunning is punishable by humor at almost every turn.
 
  Let’s take the metaphor of the story as an example. It seems to agree with the aforementioned nostalgia, and you can tell that it wants to know because The Matrix Resurrections directly tells you that it thinks reboots in an impressively offensive clip are stupid. Are Self-awareness means becoming such a metaphorical Cole Aid man. Enjoying your view? Let me break through the wall and let you know I’m not like the other sequels I’m a great sequel.
 
  This is not a cool sequel. This attempt at “deep” meta-commentary seems to come at the cost of battle scenes – something the franchise was famous for at the time. We know that Reeves still has chips, thanks to the impressive fight choreography of the John Wick franchise, and all the new players involved in Doomsday have proved their fighting skills on screen. Then, why is this huge chunk of Matrix DNA missing from its sequel? The war scenes that exist are either short-lived, full of dirty effects, or are replaced by traumatic and frightening movements. The original price was $ 63 million, and both sequels came in at $ 150 million. With that in mind, it’s hard to imagine that a lot of money wasn’t spent on Judgment Day. That is to say, it is really incomprehensible that the final scenes of The Matrix Resurrections look exactly as they do, especially compared to the much more impressive looking original that appeared on our screens 20 years ago. Came on Not only are there some incredibly awesome animations and effects happening, but there’s a moment in a warehouse where Neo is meant to be, but it’s Smith’s mouth moving in the background while Neo’s The back is towards the camera. Movies like this go through teams of people before they hit our screens, so anything that turns it into a big franchise sequel is impressive – but not in any way appreciative. Probably the only really successful plot points in The Matrix Resurrections are Neo. And the Trinity’s everlasting love story and movie franchise extended to Lore. The future for which the couple had sacrificed themselves in revolutions was clearly worth fighting for, even if it was hard for Neo to believe at first. The Trinity has a chance to shine at the very end, but Doomsday makes it very difficult to celebrate this victory considering how horrible its final act looks and how long it takes to get it to celebrate. Felt The Matrix Resurrections is the kind of movie that will go down in the history of cult because it is so funny. In fact, I can’t even say that it’s unpleasant because I spent so much of my maximum runtime laughing at how the majority of it has been misled. And, no matter how rough it is, people looking for that old memory will find what they are looking for. It’s true that it’s interesting to see Neo and Trinity again, and new players are adding interesting additions to a complex canon. At the same time, many good ideas (and visual effects) are met with a really poor performance and an unquenchable desire to be constantly erased that the best summary available is “less than the sum of its parts”.

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